hair restorer

Ghee





Ghee is Clarified butter.

It is used extensively in India and other South Asian cuisines and also in Hindu religious rituals. It is made by simmering unsalted butter, until the moisture has evaporated and  all the milk solids separate and deposit at the bottom. The scum floats on the top and the butter turns clear to a shade of light golden yellow.

Clarified butter has a lot of benefits over traditional butter. It has high smoking point, so it does not burn while cooking. Also while clarifying the butter the solid milk proteins are removed. As a result it becomes lactose free – a more tolerable product for lactose intolerant people.

Ghee, in South Asian countries is usually made from cow’s milk.  The ghee of the clarified butter is similar to the French beurre noisette/browned butter, except the settled milk solids in Ghee are not allowed to brown as much as the browned butter. Ghee has a lovely rich and nutty flavor, and enhances the flavor and taste of anything that it is added to.

Ghee/Clarified Butter



Ghee


Ingredients:

  1. 4 sticks of unsalted Butter
  2. 1 very large deep heavy bottomed pot

Preparation:

Heat the unsalted butter in low flame. It will slowly melt and start bubbling and boiling. If you are making this is a deep pot you will not need to worry about spilling over.

The process might take up to an hour. Gradually you will see the scum/foam rising to the top, and the milk solids depositing at the bottom of the pan and the butter getting transparent. Lower the heat and keep on simmering.

Be careful not to burn the solids at the bottom of the pot. They should remain at a deep yellow color with tinges of brown in them.

The foam at the top will slowly clear up and get deposited at the bottom.

You will know if its done once the liquid is transparent light golden color. The deposit should be deep yellow and not brown. Do not stir.  Strain the clarified butter through a fine strainer, and discard the solid deposit.

Note: Ghee at room temperature looks semi-solid. Ghee does not need to be refrigerated, but there is no harm if you store it in the refrigerator. Always use a clean spoon to scoop out ghee for use.



Ghee


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12 comments to Ghee

  • Thank you for this recipe!

  • lovely post and picture Soma

  • Great instructions. I have always wondered how to do this.

  • Wow, this looks delicious! Great photos, too! We’d love to see your submissions at dishfolio.com!

  • This ghee is looking so fresh and pure. Hands down to store bought ghee now, will try it soon.

  • [...] tablespoons clarified butter/ghee (may be substituted with melted [...]

  • [...] Here’s a detailed post about how to make ghee, or samna baladi, at home. This post in Agricultural Society gives some recipes for making herbal-infused or flavored ghee at home, which I haven’t yet tried, but look very intriguing! However, good butter is hard to find year-round (the springtime grasses produce the best quality milk), so it’s ideal to buy from a trusted source for the rest of the year. High-quality ghee is relatively expensive, and should never be compared in price with cheaply produced butter-substitutes or mass-produced vegetable oils. Samna was even expensive back in the day in Egypt, and yet, my grandparents used it liberally in most of their cooking because they recognized its health benefits and superior taste. [...]

  • Priya

    I find that making ghee at home can be time consuming, but I like the home-made taste. After sampling various brands of ghee, I can simply say that the best is Ancient Organics ghee. The butter they use is higher quality that any kind I can buy in the store. The quality is even better than any home-made ghee I have made or tried. Don’t waste your money on that Purity Farms stuff, it just doesn’t compare if you want the real thing. Yum!

  • [...] ghee or melted butter to brush on the naan [...]

  • [...] Here’s a detailed post about how to make ghee, or samna baladi, at home. This post in Agricultural Society gives some recipes for making herbal-infused or flavored ghee at home, which I haven’t yet tried, but look very intriguing! However, good butter is hard to find year-round (the springtime grasses produce the best quality milk), so it’s ideal to buy from a trusted source for the rest of the year. High-quality ghee is relatively expensive, and should never be compared in price with cheaply produced butter-substitutes or mass-produced vegetable oils. Samna was even expensive back in the day in Egypt, and yet, my grandparents used it liberally in most of their cooking because they recognized its health benefits and superior taste. [...]

  • HiI have tried many recipes but none has worked this great. Now I can have home made ghee used always and it is more tastier and healthy than that ones in the market.

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